Magic in the Air: A Seasonal Shift

I don’t know about you, but this time of year is my absolute favourite. It starts at the end of August and goes until the end of October. The magic in the air is so thick, you could cut it with a knife. It’s no wonder the celts and ancient pagans thought this was the time when the barrier between the spirit world and the living was thin.

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Every October I get the urge to write something magical. Last year I started a novel about wizards going to UofT and fighting a magic eating monster (Harry Potter for 20-somethings). In the past, I’ve also written stories about zombies and other spooky subject matter.

I doubt these urges will ever go away. This year, the story is an elderly witch who has to fight off an evil spirit who’s bringing back the dead.

It does make it hard to concentrate on the novel I’m supposed to be finishing in order to maybe publish it someday. Ahh well. Plenty of time for that in the sad, brown, cold, dreary days of November.

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I like to explore magic not only in writing but also visually, through photography and painting. A couple weeks ago, I went on vacation up to Algonquin Park. While the fall colours weren’t at peak (thank goodness because there would’ve been so many tourists), there was still enough autumnal magic to fill my heart.

There were plenty of subjects to photograph and I even did a little drawing of a mushroom.

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There were so many mushrooms everywhere, each time we went on a hike. I LOVE mushrooms. They’re so interesting and fun.

I was also able to do some stargazing, which is one of my favourite things to do up north. I love being able to see the milky way, something about it makes me feel so small. Though most of the nights were cloudy and the moon was getting quite full, so stargazing wasn’t really possible. BUT I was able to take a picture of some stars and after a teeny tiny bit of editing, I think it turned out pretty good (for my first try).

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Fun fact: We were up there during the equinox and we danced around a bonfire… okay, we huddled around a very sad little fire.

Anyway, this blog post started off so eloquent and on-topic. But let’s not kid ourselves, this was just a way for me to show off my awesome pictures. I hope you enjoyed them!

Have a wonderfully magical autumn!ūüćā

Thoughts from Away ~ Healing Nature

I felt my lungs inflate with the onrush of scenery‚ÄĒair, mountains, trees, people. I thought, “This is what it is to be happy.” –¬†Sylvia Plath,¬†The Bell Jar

 

I spent the past weekend frolicking in the forest up north in Algonquin Park. My family usually spends a weekend there in early May in the hopes of seeing moose. Early May is a good time to see moose.

When the snow melts, the salt from the roads creates salty puddles that the nutrient-deficient moose like to drink from. If you have luck on your side and are strong enough to get up early, there should be an abundance of moose to view.

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Unfortunately, we only saw one moose this year.

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(I’m so sorry for this crappy picture)

Despite a lack of moose, I still enjoyed myself immensely. I’d been feeling a bit rundown at work and was in need of a refresh.

I personally believe in the healing power of nature. Something about being under the sky, surrounded by fresh air, trees in all directions, is good for the soul.

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Obviously, it’s not a catch-all solution; I’m a full supporter of getting proper treatment for mental health problems whether it’s medication or not. For my personal brand of high-functioning anxiety and depression, I find time away from civilization to be beneficial.

People aren’t meant to be so disconnected from nature.

I also firmly believe that if you¬†can get out into nature, you should. It can’t hurt. Simply going to a local park might be enough, or even standing under a tree (it would probably appreciate the company).

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Coming home is always bittersweet because I could just spend forever up there surrounded by woods. I definitely want to come back as a tree. A big oak tree.

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*In all these pictures, the lakes are still partially frozen. The upsettingly sad April we had meant the lakes up north have only started melting. It was interesting though, seeing all the chunks of ice.